Nov. 29: Jeff Campbell & Joe Marson


7:30 pm @ Bikenetic
201 West Jefferson St., Falls Church
(BIKENETIC is moving!)
RSVP: stoneroomconcerts@gmail.com


Jeff Campbell’s onstage experiences have taken him to coast to coast countless times and found him sharing stages with John Mayer, members of Counting Crows, The Grateful Dead, and opening for Train. After being crowned winner of Guitar Center's National Singer Songwriter Competition out of over 13,000 entrants,  his 2013 EP Release, “In Spite of Everything”, produced by 6x Grammy Winner John Shanks, premiered at #1 on the iTunes rock EPs and singles charts, following a performance on the Jimmy Kimmel Live! show.

Watch him strap an acoustic guitar on his back, board a public bus with 75 strangers, and traipse his way across the country. Here’s a singer-songwriter who loves nothing more than the sound of his voice reverberating off a music venue’s back walls. Yes, this is Jeff Campbell’s life, and as he’ll readily tell you, it isn’t so much a choice as it’s his calling. “This is just who I am” says the vocalist, impassioned songwriter and lifelong musician who with The Kitchen Sink, has at long last concocted the album that represents him at his core and is willing to do whatever it takes to feel the rush of human connection. 



For Campbell, it’s all in the spirit of connectivity: eliminate as many barriers as possible between the writer and the audience. Sure, he knows he could record hundreds of videos on YouTube and pray one goes viral, but that’s not him. Even as his fanbase continues to swell, Campbell craves intimacy and immediacy. “Performing live is absolutely my favorite part of this thing.” Campbell says. “Whether it’s a big stage or a small room, there’s really no better feeling than connecting the music with the audience. When you know they’re with you, it’s the best ever.”

Joe Marson is a Brooklyn transplant whose music resonates in the realm of alternative folk-rock, with a defiant bluesy edge. Marson delivers full-bodied, soulful ballads charged with slow thumping percussion, powerfully swelling harmonies and fervent, evocative lyricism.

A wanderer, Marson spent a good six years traveling the nation prior to settling in NY’s best borough. That epoch gives marked spark to his songwriting. “I was soul searching and trying to find who I was, as a person as well as musically,” Marson told Best New Bands, “I wanted to dip my toes in different experiences and genres before writing about them.”

“The best musicians have real life experiences and real wisdom,” he continued, “I needed to come from that place in order to feel authentic to myself. I’ve seen the lowest of lows that I can image and some pretty high highs. I write from those experiences.”




Of his writing process, Marson added, “It’s sort of a mystery to me, still. Sometimes the lyrics come slow, sometimes it’s like squeezing blood from a rock.” Yet, as evidenced by the way this musician has lived, Marson’s work is built on intuition. His candidness lends discernible heart to his work, a trait most apparent in his live performances. His most recent video, for “Goddamit Julia,” displays this quality expertly. Wearing his heart on his sleeve like a badge of honor, Marson’s willingness to embrace exposure is a nod to accepting and sharing what makes us human.